In partnership with
  • Terry Bell's Inside Labour

    The PIC, which holds nearly R2trn of workers’ pension funds, needs to come clean or face legal action.

  • Ian Mann's book review

    Both giants and SMEs need to be prepared for the 15 disruptive forces that are driving change.

  • Redeem yourself, Gerrie!

    In joining AfriForum, Gerrie Nel has moved out of the reputational frying pan into the fire, says Solly Moeng.

Loading...

Current land claims will take 178 years to clear, says researcher

May 17 2018 11:48
Khulekani Magubane

Cape Town – Land reform has progressed so slowly in South Africa that current claims alone would take 178 years to conclude if government were to continue working at the same pace.

This is according to Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS) researcher Professor Ruth Hall, who spoke at a land reform debate organised by the University of Stellenbosch's business school on Thursday morning. PLAAS is a land rights research institution housed by the University of the Western Cape.

The debate comes at a time when Parliament is preparing to investigate the need to amend the Constitution, with a view to allowing the state the power to expropriate land without compensation.

During his last appearance before the National Assembly, President Cyril Ramaphosa urged South Africans to “wake up and smell the coffee” when it came to the urgency of the land question.

Hall said the 3.5 million hectares of land which had been restored to people might sound impressive, but next to the sheer volume of land claims lodged before the previous deadline of the late 1990s, it was insignificant.

“At the current pace, it is estimated that in order to address all the claims sitting with the government now, it would take another 35 years. And we are sitting with a situation where courts have ruled [that] government cannot process new claims without concluding the current claims,” she said.

Hall added that the new claims that followed the late '90s deadline are so numerous that it is estimated processing them would take government a further 143 years.

“So that is 35 years plus another 143 years. We got to this point [due to] the state of the economy, but also because the ANC and the EFF mean different things when they talk about expropriation,” Hall said.

* Sign up to Fin24's top news in your inbox: SUBSCRIBE TO FIN24 NEWSLETTER

Follow Fin24 on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Pinterest. 24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

NEXT ON FIN24X

 
 
 
 

Company Snapshot

Money Clinic

Money Clinic
Do you have a question about your finances? We'll get an expert opinion.
Click here...

Voting Booth

Have you considered your options for retirement?

Previous results · Suggest a vote

Loading...