Fin24

Jobs SA's most urgent need: survey

2011-04-05 15:22

Johannesburg - Ninety percent of urban adults feel that the most pressing need in South Africa is job creation, a survey released on Tuesday showed.

Said TNS Research Surveys innovation head Neil Higgs: "77% feel that is housing, whereas a much smaller 54% feel that the water supply will become a big problem in future."

The survey was conducted at the beginning of the year among a sample of 2 000 South African adults from the seven major metropolitan areas.

People were interviewed face-to-face in their homes, and there was a margin error of under 2.5%.

The survey showed that all race groups agreed that job creation was important, Higgs said.

According to the survey 91% of blacks, 85% of whites, 95% of coloureds and 93% of Indians felt job creation was a pressing need.

Blacks, coloureds and Indians felt the need for houses was a close second to the need for jobs.

For whites, the water problem ranked second and housing third, he said.

Eighty-three percent of blacks, 51% of whites, 84% of coloureds and 83% of Indians felt the most pressing need in South Africa was for houses.

"The housing shortage is felt more acutely by younger people and by those, not surprisingly, living in informal dwellings and in smaller dwellings (mostly middle-income people), where the need for better housing equals that of the need for employment," Higgs said.

Forty-eight percent of blacks, 67% of whites, 65% of coloureds and 62% of Indians felt the supply of water in South Africa would become a big problem.

"The water supply problem is perceived to be greater by older people," he said.

At the end of 2010, the government released its new growth path framework introducing public policy aimed at "enhancing growth, employment creation, and equity".

Economic Development Minister Ebrahim Patel said the policy's target was to create five million jobs over the next 10 years.

Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan expanded on this in his 2011 national budget speech.

Higgs said it was clear that, in broad terms, the government's framework was in line with what South Africans felt was the most pressing need.

"However, the need for houses is also perceived to be high," he said.

"The water issue is seen in a very different light in different areas, due no doubt, in part, to the type of rainy season different areas have had.

"Given that South Africa's water supply is indeed under threat, this misperception is potentially serious."

Comments
  • Slapper - 2011-04-05 15:38

    The ANC is going a good way about it to destroy the few jobs available, with their 90 year old policies that have not worked anywhere on Earth, even with much more intelligent cadres.

  • Steve Wonderboy - 2011-04-05 16:20

    Well I could have told them that 17 years ago, duh

  • nws - 2011-04-05 16:22

    if got a solution for job creation first remove politics from the military the u send all the boys between 18 and 25 to the military for two years then all the people older than 25 with out a job will have a job then it will tech the youth to work together and end the racial gap in south Africa

      resiststance - 2011-04-05 17:32

      Some kind of "social service" whether it be military or otherwise (Military only is probably not a good idea people should at least have some choice) should be compulsory in order to get a welfare grant, that way nobody gets anything completely for free, even if the work they are doing doesn't create massive benefit for society at large at least it would teach some proper ethic and break the entitlement mentality, also it would keep people busy which would also go a long way to helping.

  • WiseOwl2 - 2011-04-05 16:59

    Please help us businesspeople to employ - remove Cosatu and our prohibitive employment regulation. Wake up ANC, Cosatu you are destroying the economy !!!!

      garco - 2011-05-05 09:09

      SA needs its own Margareth Thatcher. This will change things for the better. I think Zille is a good candidate. Let's suppeort the DA South Africa Local and Nationally.

  • gksa - 2011-04-05 17:13

    Why are we still breaking down statistics into racial categories? Surely breakdowns such as rich/middle-income/poor, urban/rural, young/middle-aged/senior etc. would be much more useful? Especially given that the further we get from 1994, the less homogenous each of the racial groups are becoming... I'm sure that the opinions of well-to-do people living in the city are much closer aligned to their counterparts in a different racial grouping, than it is to the opinions of impoverished people of the same race living in rural areas. And how should a child of one white parent and one black parent label him/herself for the purposes of these surveys? Coloured? That would be ridiculous...

  • Dougalan - 2011-04-05 17:14

    The way to ensure more jobs is to start with better education. That menas train more teachers, and equip schools better. Then re-start the technikons that the ANC stupidly closed. Start more skills training colleges. The ANC as usual has just talked and talked, and done zilch. Jobs won't appear magically out of the air. Decent education and training has to precede it. I very much like the proposed DA mayor's plan for Jhb. It will greatly help with training and future job creation.

      Philip Darne - 2011-04-19 12:42

      Dougalan, the laws need to be conducive to creating employment, that my friend is where the problem lies..believe me.

  • gksa - 2011-04-05 17:15

    Why are we still breaking down statistics into racial categories? Surely breakdowns such as rich/middle-income/poor, urban/rural, young/middle-aged/senior etc. would be much more useful? Especially given that the further we get from 1994, the less homogenous each of the racial groups are becoming... I'm sure that the opinions of well-to-do people living in the city are much closer aligned to their counterparts in a different racial grouping, than it is to the opinions of impoverished people of the same race living in rural areas. And how should a child of one white parent and one black parent label him/herself for the purposes of these surveys? Coloured? That would be ridiculous...

  • Ascendo Tuum - 2011-04-05 17:20

    Stopping have a gazillion children I would think would be SA's most pressing need. Get that right and voila, enough jobs for everyone. Spend a few bucks on condoms, injections or pills or even getting them for free at clinics. Or the age old way of saying no and keeping your legs closed. But no, we have to waste more billions and billions creating jobs. If you don't sort out the population growth, you will never, ever have enough of anything to go around.

  • robsolomon - 2011-04-05 17:25

    Unfortunately with the labor laws in this Country, people are afraid/reluctant to hire people. They know that if the employee is not satisfactory they will battle to fire them without having to go to the labor court. If we did away with all those laws it would encourage a lot more job opportunities. I know some people will be dismissed unfairly but it will create more jobs than unhappy workers.

  • skippy - 2011-04-06 05:41

    Hi, having lived in Australia and been back to SA a couple of times - last year for 6 months, I would like to add my unvaluable little comment. Goverment is not letting go of the Apartheid era and due to that, nobody wants to invest in a country that allows their past to hamper their future. If after 17 years the past Goverment is still being called upon as an excuse I have little hope of SA ever moving forward. Who is going to invest in a country and people that live in the past. When you are dealt a job on what happened in the past? Surely jobs should be on merit, not colour, age or sex.

      Philip Darne - 2011-04-19 12:44

      Well said skippy, see you in Aus soon!

  • Future prospects - 2011-04-06 07:58

    Lets face facts, the political agenda's of the ruling party and its trade union alliance far outways any job creation priorities.

  • Leslie - 2011-04-06 10:13

    To boost the economy so that the economy could create more jobs ,the government has allocated large sums of money for improving infrastructure .That will definitely help.But the government does not have the capacity to do this.Without action, the promise is empty.As it is not the policy of the government to appoint , within its ranks, responsible qualified personal who can do what it says (improve infrastructure).Please will some body ask them to appoint private consultants to take over and get the job done efficiently.Thank you.Les Gray

  • mafura - 2011-04-06 12:47

    Surely employment will lead to housing (whether it is a rented room, own house does not matter). Having a house but no income to maintain it is pretty useless, as the windows will break and the walls fall apart - then who will fix it?

  • Jan MacKay - 2011-04-14 19:02

    Let me put the job creation plan into some perspective for you. in a year we have roughly 225 real working days, Excluding strikes and other non productive day's unofficially taken off. Suppose SA INC create the 5 million jobs in 10 years then it would be much easier to break this "project" down into bite size chunks. 5 million devided by 2 250 days (10 years worth of work days) you get: 2 222 per day. This seem like more achievable IF: 1. Our political leaders can get over their obsession of blame 2. Those corrupt officials with own agenda is removed from office 3. Malema stop being himself (un-educated idiot) 4. Those in Power (President Zuma please note) use the power for the good of the people. 5. Massive investment in SMME sector (not training - CASH investment in real business) 6. Stop this drive to train people because no matter how much education you provide - if you can't find a job all the education on the planet will not help you. 7. BEE is a system of the elite African few to make sure they are the beneficiaries of ever decreasing resources. Stop this practice and rather create a model of economic development that will benefit the entire economy, regardless of race. 8. Offer real cash incentives for real permanent jobs created. 9. Move away from the old industrial way of thinking, rather embrace the new technology world and incubate the information society. 10. Use the fiscus suplus and funds not spend on infrastructure development.

  • Jan MacKay - 2011-04-14 19:22

    This task seem almost impossible. However if one assume we have 225 real working days per annum then we need to create 2 222 jobs per day in this country. Another way to look at this is to measure it in SMME companies. Suppose each newco in the SMME sector could employ 6 people, we need to create 800 000 new businesses employing 6 people each. Now it seem that unless some real funding is made availabe to establish new ventures this target will never be achieved. Maybe we should spend another billion on training - seem that is the thing to do. One problem, no matter how well trained workers get, if there is no jobs their education means nothing.

  • Philip Darne - 2011-04-19 12:40

    I as a business owner am desperately trying to get rid of my 22 employees....any takers? The laws do not do justice to the employer, until this happens anyone who employs someone in South Africa has to have rocks in their head. It's so bad that the government has to outsource everything?

  • BENOUDEBOK - 2011-06-09 15:29

    Well this is very interesting you have 2 great needs as identified by all the surveys done and it also give us a solution to our problem. The government need to concentrate on building decent houses which will create jobs but the roll out to build these houses will have to escalate at a rapid pace. I also suggest that all houses should be made available on a rental system where agencies can be implemented to collect the money.A criteria need to be implemented that will qualify someone for the rental units. The rental units must also be categorized to make it affordable for all with a opportunity to migrate to a better home. This will in return create massive spin off's in job creation if the scale to produce these houses are increased all over the country. A system to spread these contracts to the construction sector where contractors must qualify on the criteria of skill and previous records and on a rotation basis where one contractor is not favored but everyone can qualify if he meets the criteria. This will in it self create opportunities for new businesses to be opened.

  • pages:
  • 1