Fin24

Fuel strike threatens taxi industry

2011-07-20 11:04

Johannesburg - The ongoing fuel sector strike is threatening the taxi industry's operations, the SA National Taxi Council said on Wednesday.

"If the petrol strike continues, the taxi industry will have no means to conduct business," said spokesperson Tabisho Molelekwa.

Clement Chitja, head of collective bargaining for the Chemical, Energy, Paper, Printing, Wood, and Allied Workers Union (Ceppwawu), denied that the strike was to blame for fuel shortages.

"There are transport companies contracted to deliver fuel. It is a separate industry and they are not on strike."

He said the fuel shortage was therefore "not necessarily" as a result of the strike, but implied there were logistical problems unrelated to the industrial action.

Molelekwa said the fuel shortage was impacting on the taxi industry in two ways.

Taxi drivers had to travel off their normal business routes to find garages that had petrol. This increased the cost of operations, cutting into profits.

Secondly, the additional time it took to find fuel and deviations from normal routes meant the operations would not run as smoothly.

"This is why the industry will find it difficult to operate if the strike continues," he said.

The suspension of taxi services would have severe knock-on effects for other sectors of the economy as many workers would have no means of getting to work,"except walking", Moleleka said.

Fuel Retailers Association chief executive Reggie Sibiya said fuel shortages had already reached critical levels, particularly in Gauteng townships and central business districts.

"Gauteng is the hardest hit. We have heard that at least 300 petrol stations have run dry and the situation is worsening," he said.

KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo are also experiencing shortages.

"If we do not get resolution on the strike this week, Gauteng will soon be entering crisis mode."

Sibiya said many fuel retailers had been forced to send their employees home because there was no petrol to sell.

"These employees are often the main breadwinners for their families and the strike is forcing them to stay at home."

Chitja said by Thursday afternoon the union was likely to have received feedback from its members on whether the employers' offer had been accepted.

On Monday Ceppwawu, the Allied Workers Union, Solidarity and the General Industries Workers Union of SA met with employers for wage negotiation talks.

Chitja said the employers had offered a 10% increase for workers at the lowest level, raising their minimum wage from R4 000 to R4 400. Other levels were offered 8%.

The strike began last week on Monday, with Solidarity joining a week later in the hopes of lending a greater sense of urgency to the negotiation process. 

Comments
  • Hail@24.com - 2011-07-20 11:22

    Oh please. Even when there is plenty of fuel the taxi industry couldn't give a toss about their passengers or as he refers to them as "breadwinners" when they want to strike.

  • Goose - 2011-07-20 11:32

    I am soo glad the taxi industry is suffering too. Now they have just an inkling of what the rest of us go through. Just because the cause of the disruption is black, they don't do anything about it. Very selective these people are-or should I rather just call them hypocrites?

  • Koos - 2011-07-20 11:34

    dont be selfish .... niot just the taxi's...... this affects everybody... food, retail and so on.... the whole economy will be affected!

  • The Dude - 2011-07-20 11:37

    great !! let the taxi industry and strikers fight it out !! cant wait for the taxis to run out , then the strikers cant get to where they meant to strike !! then we wont have the shocking drivers on our roads !

  • gcr - 2011-07-20 11:41

    Chitja needs to explain why the trucks that are leaving depots have to be escorted by police - there is only one reason there rabble is hauling drivers out of trucks and threatening and attacking the drivers. Have no sympathy for trade unionists and their followers they are all a collction of thugs

  • marisa.cronje - 2011-07-20 11:41

    i think this is hilarious.

  • Johane254 - 2011-07-20 11:44

    Ag shame, but does the taxi industry care about how they impact other industries when they go on strike. Don't think so... And, the roads are much safer with less taxis.

  • Annoy - 2011-07-20 11:46

    Stupids no work no pay - go back to work and let you union members do the negoation for you - thats why you pay union fees - Union members get paid while you are striking

  • Monsterz - 2011-07-20 11:46

    IF IT MEANS KEEPING THESE UNLAWABIDING IDIOTS OFF THE ROADS, GOOD!!! LET THE STRIKE GO ON. oNE OF THESE DAYS THE ROADS WILL BE A PLEASURE TO DRIVE ON. YEAAHH!!!

  • Susan - 2011-07-20 11:55

    No taxis on the road...........heaven for civilised drivers!!!

  • shane.jacoby - 2011-07-20 11:55

    Hopefully now the Taxi industry knows what it feels like when their work gets affected by a strike... Think twice before you strike... Your striking cause a domino effect on other industries costing more moeny than the problems it solves...

  • tryanything - 2011-07-20 11:58

    WoW Now For a Strike To protest A strike..

  • WazzyP - 2011-07-20 12:02

    Oh, so that's what its like to be at the receiving end of a strike... Anyone else see the irony here?

  • RobW - 2011-07-20 12:05

    Good to see. Maybe the National Taxi Alliance can 'uncourage' the strikers to get back to work

  • Mark - 2011-07-20 12:07

    May the fuel strike continue indefinetely if it means keeping taxis off the roads.

  • Jack McRip - 2011-07-20 12:12

    No work no pay. The situation will sort itself out in the townships. If my family is going hungry because you are striking then surely I have the right to defend my family. Let the strike continue and reduce the offer to 6% until the masses who depend on taxis go hungry.

      tryanything - 2011-07-21 06:43

      Catch22 situation of sorts At least if you dont climb into a taxi your life expectancy increases and that of others as well.

  • Totman - 2011-07-20 12:17

    I know the taxi industries are important, but my car's tank is full and just maybe I will have a day or two peacefull driving without them around.lol.

  • Kiepies - 2011-07-20 12:20

    CLEVER OUKIES THINKING THEY CAN STRIKE, BREAK THE ROAD LAW IN EVERY WAY AND NOW THEY ARE CRYING - BUT WAIT, WHEN STRIKES ARE OVER, VOILA, EVERYTHING WILL BE MORE EXPENSIVE BECAUSE EMPLOYERS HAD TO INCREASE PRICE OF GOODS IN ORDER TO PAY INCREASES AS DEMANDED, SO BRIGHT STARS, WHAT NOW!!!

  • kambaku - 2011-07-20 12:27

    Well, now there is a possitove spin-off of the strikes, fewer menacing taxis on the roads.

  • johan - 2011-07-20 12:28

    YOU VOTED FOR THE ANC. YOU JOINED THE UNIONS.YOU PEOPLE ARE THE REASON SOUTH AFRICA IS IN SUCH A TERRIBLE STATE.ASK MALEMA FOR FUEL. HAVE A NICE DAY.

      Jim - 2011-07-20 13:45

      Malema is pleading that he is not a rich man. Shame , should we do a collection for him? "BLOODY AGENT"

      DEVILS SON - 2011-07-20 15:41

      send him food parcels, its embarrassing

      David - 2011-07-20 21:42

      HAHAHAHAHAHA!

  • Gierg Seiznem - 2011-07-20 12:40

    "Chitja said the employers had offered a 10% increase for workers at the lowest level, raising their minimum wage from R4 000 to R4 400. Other levels were offered 8%." Seems like a good deal to me. Let's hope sanity prevails. I wouldn't bet on it though...

  • masenya30 - 2011-07-20 12:45

    i support the idea this is really annoying we end up using wrong fuel because u cant reach to other fuel station

  • Rapier - 2011-07-20 12:49

    The observation here, by way of a Headline, tells us that the Strike "Threatens the Taxi Industry" - the ramifications and impact can only be wider than that - my very existence as a small business owner is now in jeopardy as I can only get to clients by using my small car. There are MANY unseen effects as well - the Petrol Station attendants are not needed, so do not receive an income - so their families cannot buy food....and so the list lengthens.

      50something - 2011-07-20 13:34

      Try and explain this to these morons and their unions. I accept that there could be differences in the workplace, but strikes have become the norm. Why can't a small deligation negotiate with employers whilst the others are still doing their job?

  • 50something - 2011-07-20 13:31

    Well, maybe they are getting their own medicine when they decide to strike and leave commuters standed.

  • Hannes Lourens - 2011-07-20 13:35

    What these striking individuals don't get is that they're killing the economy! Forget about the taxis for a while. Think about this. Without fuel or diesel the farmers cannot use their machinery and trucks to get fruit and veg and maize etc. to the consumer. Businesses cannot get stock from supliers. Sales reps cannot get to their clients. People cannot get to work. And then the main problem is our airports. OR Tambo has just been voted the best airport in Africa. Busses needs diesel to carry passengers to and from planes. Catering vans needs diesel to get food to the planes. And then of course aircraft needs Jet A1 fuel to fly being transported by trucks using diesel. They are crippling our main foreign and domestic gateways plus our economy. Only in South Africa and Africa people will get away with striking and still keep their jobs. In any other country they would have been fired already. Wake up goverment and President Zuma! We're going to end up like Zimbabwe!

      tryanything - 2011-07-24 16:52

      Zuma wont wakeup cause he cant.

  • Jim - 2011-07-20 13:42

    Oh great then we will be safe on the roads again. With these lawless taxi drivers off our roads. Get a new bike. Great Stuff.

  • Ossewa - 2011-07-21 06:27

    Clement Chitja.... "He said the fuel shortage was therefore "not necessarily" as a result of the strike, but implied there were logistical problems unrelated to the industrial action." If I understand that correctly, then the striking workers had no effect on the fuel shortages.... does that mean that the striking workers was redundant in the first place, or that they were so unproductive, that nobody even noticed when they were missing?

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