Fin24

Alarm over 1.9m jobless youths

2011-05-03 22:35

Johannesburg - It is concerning that 1.9 million unemployed people are new entrants into the labour market, Fedusa said on Tuesday.

"This figure translates into a staggering 43.4% of those who are unemployed," Federation of Unions of SA (Fedusa) general secretary Dennis George said in a statement.

"What are we doing to provide jobs for our young people... many of them have qualifications and skills and they remain unemployed?" he asked.

The information was released on Tuesday in the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) which reflected data collected on the labour market activities of people aged between 15 and 64.

While the survey showed that the number of people in the labour force increased between October 2010 and March 2011, employment figures decreased by 14 000 over the period, George said.

The number of unemployed people increased by 227 000 between October 2010 and March 2011, while the number of work-seekers increased by 73 000.

"These figures indicate that the South Africa economy is still very much recovering from the recent global recession, however sustainable job creation must be made a priority," George said.

Fedusa's observation was that the hardest hit industries were transport, construction and agriculture, he said.

Job losses had been experienced in most provinces except Gauteng, the Western Cape and Mpumalanga.

George said Fedusa was pleased that there had been an increase in jobs in crafts and related trades, and sales and services.

"This highlights the importance of skilled artisans," he said.

"South Africa needs to equip workers with the necessary skills that will lay the foundations for entrepreneurs and the increased creation of small to medium businesses which will in turn create more jobs and increase economic growth."

Comments
  • Benzo - 2011-05-03 23:05

    "This highlights the importance of skilled artisans," he said. "South Africa needs to equip workers with the necessary skills that will lay the foundations for entrepreneurs and the increased creation of small to medium businesses which will in turn create more jobs and increase economic growth." Took you a while to work that one out. Now go and tell Zuma and Malema.

  • william.botha - 2011-05-03 23:22

    Don't worry, JZ will get them some jobs. He promised..

  • Gen - 2011-05-03 23:36

    I cannot believe that the ANC is THAT stupid (even if present voters are)that they did not have any idea that the future required jobs for their voters. The fact that they have no plans to try reduce the birth rate is also exacerbating the problem. The future looks rather hair raising for the ANC in the next election if things don't change quickly. The chances of being in power till Jesus comes is looking bleak if jobs are not created soon. If the ANC thinks that the voters of the future are going to sell their votes for one food hamper every five years, they had another thing coming. The voters of the future may be uneducated, but they will not be as stupid as most of the present voters, they will see through all the mirrors and empty promises.

  • Neal Money! - 2011-05-04 00:22

    I am not surprised! I am a proudly South African who now lives in a foreign country just because I sat for over a year looking for a job, with a degree in SA! We are told that we must study and help rebuild the country when we are young and it seems that my country can't cater for my simple needs, aka spend huge amounts of money on a tertiary education and at least get a internship or crappy starter job that helps you proceed if you work hard enough. All I wanted was a chance to prove myself. Waste of time in South Africa for most. I applied for work on an overseas job site and now live in the USA earning a brilliant salary. Am a sell out? How can I be, when all I wanted to do was be independent. I had to take a plane halfway across the world in order to feel as if I am a man, in the traditional sense. I now have a wife and kids and live in a crime non ex existent town, whereby I can stop at a robot at 12pm in the evening and not worry about locking my doors. I want to come back, I want to invest in the country but frankly it is a mess with lawlessness running rife and not worth my time and effort. My only wish is that my country becomes a place where everyone can respect each other and everyone can have peace of mind, so to speak.

  • Blougroen - 2011-05-04 01:02

    Yes - that is why - at the behest of COSATU - those who create jobs and employ people must be punished by means excessive regulation, endless strikes, endless public holidays, laws that force employers to keep useless workers on their books, excessive rates and taxes, creating a socio-political environment in which crime and corruption destroys small companies, civil servants on the take, interrupted electricity supply (whilst at the same time preventing companies from generating their own power) excessive red tape, over-regulation targeting the lowest common denominators, endless law changes, an increasingly uncertain investment environment caused by policy drift towards nationalisation of land, water and mineral rights, enforced BEE targets in employment and procurement, the destruction of capable and internationally competitive firms through these skewed policies, etc. etc. - no wonder the majority of the next generation of entrepreneurs that should have been creating jobs for the unemployed youth are now plying their trade overseas – as the new migrant workers – a proudly South African product . . .

  • Sagebrush - 2011-05-04 02:04

    Something needs to be done about this for the sake of long term stability of the country.It must be awful not being able to work.

  • Eugene - 2011-05-04 02:06

    Someone please shed some light on this for me: say I get the qualifications, the skill or whatever it is that employers want you to have, the one thing they require is EXPERIENCE! Open any newspaper for job adverts, look on any website that advertises jobs, they want EXPERIENCE!!!! I'm taking it from myself: I want to work for the Provincial government or the City of Cape Town as a mere admin clerk, knowing I'm confident to do admin, I am sure the one reason I have never been successfull in any of my applications it is because I do not have any EXPERIENCE! They want you to work on SAP. Fair enough, but how do you gain experience in working on SAP if no one want to give you a job where you can get the experience. Must you work for free or for peanuts?

  • Joe - 2011-05-04 02:28

    the number will be a LOT less if you consider crime a job...

  • FarmerBrown - 2011-05-04 02:34

    According to Malema , maybe they should be paid to impregnate the teenagers that make it out of school without child.

  • Julius - 2011-05-04 04:33

    An those gurus at the Reserve Bank are thinking of putting UP interest rates. Unreal but never forget the PEOPLE chose THIS government

      The captain - 2011-06-09 18:36

      Actually Julius- raising interest rates is the correct thing to do. The reserve bank has a mandate of controlling inflation. Inflation is really not good- if it runs to 10% or more then even if you have a job, you will not be able to afford to buy basic goods- without a heafty increase- and that just makes the problem worse as that money has to come from somewhere, usually increasing the cost of goods that your company sells. It forces people to stop spending , thereby lowering prices ( supply demand) the wise would skimp on unneeded goods and save . The only way to improve our lot is to improve productivity.

  • Kevin Rack - 2011-05-04 04:51

    This is a sad indication of a poor performing government. Julius is tapping into this disenfranchised section with his rhetoric. Julius should get out of court and start creating jobs and not scaring off investors with 1970's failed bush economics.

  • BigD - 2011-05-04 06:02

    you could halve that number if you took away the unworkable labour laws. Many companies import goods instead off local manufacture due to the restrictive labour laws. If you have a worker that is trouble and and useless you have a huge problem getting rid of them.

  • Born To Fish - 2011-05-04 06:55

    That is what you get from BEE policies and the strict labour laws

  • Sam - 2011-05-04 07:29

    If you look at the social unrest in Libya, Egypt, Yemen and other countries, it is all being caused by the youths in the same age group referred to in the article. These young people's numbers are growing fast and they can be the spark that ignites upheavel in this country. The general population is angry with the government inability to create jobs and they will be just as eager to revolt as the youth are. Scary thought but true!

  • Mr.Helmut - 2011-05-04 07:44

    This needs some urgent attention. The Germans had what was called the "Reichs Arbeits Dienst" in pricip a great idea unfortunatly misused by the Nazi Party. It removed tousand of young (unemployed)from the streets. Maybe its warrents a deeper look

  • Hunter 008 - 2011-05-04 08:02

    Well done ANC !!!!!You are doing fantastic work !!!What happened to JOBS, JOBS, JOBS....Ha Ha

  • ecoecho - 2011-05-04 08:45

    Whilst I agree it is alarming, young people can still stay at home with parents etc., but for those of us adults who have lost jobs/cannot find jobs it is an even bigger problem as there is no one to turn to. We all have commitments, and with the prices of everything going up too, we are probably a % that is ignored. Our UIF only covers people for a % of their previous salary, and then only for a period of time. So, I am left wondering where the figures for unemployment come from? Are they taken only from the numbers of people who sign on with the UIF? I doubt anyone bothers to check about people who have been out of work for any length of time.

  • ecoecho - 2011-05-04 08:47

    Whilst I agree it is alarming, young people can still stay at home with parents etc., but for those of us adults who have lost jobs/cannot find jobs it is an even bigger problem as there is no one to turn to. We all have commitments, and with the prices of everything going up too, we are probably a % that is ignored. Our UIF only covers people for a % of their previous salary, and then only for a period of time. So, I am left wondering where the figures for unemployment come from? Are they taken only from the numbers of people who sign on with the UIF? I doubt anyone bothers to check about people who have been out of work for any length of time.

  • Zebelon - 2011-05-04 12:13

    Zuma keeps promising those who believe his many promises that there will be a five million job increase in five years. And yet jobs are currently being lost.

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